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Archive for the ‘love loss’ Category

Paris ShootingThe TFT Foundation offers its sincere condolences to those in France affected by the recent shootings. Please let anyone you know that has been traumatized by this tragic event about our site, which has the instructions for the TFT trauma relief technique in 14 languages, including French. Here is the link you can pass along: www.TFTtraumarelief.com.

La fondation TFT présente ses sincères condoléances à ceux en France qui ont été affectés par les fusillades récentes. Faites connaître notre site s’il vous plait, à toute personne de votre connaissance  traumatisée par cet événement tragique. Il contient les instructions de la technique TFT d’allègement des traumatismes dans 14 langues différentes dont le français. Voici le lien que vous pouvez diffuser largement : http://www.TFTtraumarelief.com.

 

 

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Each year the International Day of Peace is observed around the world on 21 September. The General Assembly has declared this as a day devoted to strengthening the ideals of peace, both within and among all nations and peoples.” The United Nations website

What better way to honor and celebrate this international day of peace than by sharing the TFT trauma relief technique with others? We now have instructions in 15 languages. If you know anyone who is suffering from the effects of trauma, or anyone who is working with people who are, please direct them to this site.

We invite you to also share the following trailer to the TFT Foundation’s film, “From Trauma to Peace,” which is scheduled for release at the end of this month. The film is a powerful demonstration of how effective TFT is in promoting peace.

 

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In memory of those who suffered from the 9/11 tragedy–and in the effort to relieve their suffering and that of the many others who are traumatized by violence–we are reposting Ms. Bahr-Groth’s story of visiting New York five days after the event to help survivors with TFT. For another profound 9/11 TFT story, click here. 

World Trade Center Trauma Relief in New York

By Diane Bahr-Groth, CH, TFT-Adv

On Sunday, September 16, 2001, Kay and Jan, two women I trained in TFT, and I left our seemingly safe little town of Stamford, Connecticut and drove toward New York City. Unable to simply watch the horror of the World Trade Center disaster and its aftermath days before we decided to make our way into the city and find a way to help those in need. Armed with 2,000 copies of the Thought Field Therapy trauma/anxiety algorithm, a simple paper sign reading “Free, Trauma Relief”, a few bottles of water and a little folding table we began our somber journey.

It was one of those lovely late summer days with a perfectly clear blue sky and bright sun. We decided to put the top down on my convertible hoping the sunlight would lighten our spirits. The beauty of the day made it seem more incredible that such horror could have occurred.

As we passed the George Washington Bridge, just minutes from midtown Manhattan, the truth of the disaster could be seen and smelled. The awful sight of the empty skyline shrouded in white smoke shocked me beyond words. I, of course, had seen the news day after day and knew that the World Trade Center no longer stood tall and majestic in the sky. Still, I heard the words in my mind over and over saying “It’s not there…… It’s not there.”….. The tears streamed down my face as the truth and reality of all I knew set in.

The acrid scent of the smoke filled our nostrils and reinforced the certainty that so many had died. While driving and trying to absorb the shock of the situation, I treated myself with the trauma algorithm, often fixing my reversal. I noticed Kay and Jan treating themselves as well. We drove for miles in silence looking at the skyline which is now and forever changed.

We drove to lower Manhattan and tried to get as close to Ground Zero as possible. We miraculously found a parking space just in front of the memorial sight at Union Square Park. It is a lovely little park naturally filled with flowers and trees and but now filled with photos, candles and posters of those who were missing.

Thousands of New Yorkers were walking through the park bringing flowers, praying and connecting with others. It was there, close to the makeshift memorials, that we began (more…)

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journalphotoTHOUGHT FIELD THERAPY EFFICACY FOLLOWING LARGE SCALE TRAUMATIC EVENTS

Ann L. Dunnewold

Abstract

Thought Field Therapy Efficacy Following Large Scale Traumatic Events: Description of Four Studies Thought Field Therapy (TFT) has been shown to reduce symptoms of Posttraumatic Stress (PTS) with trauma survivors in four studies in Africa.

In a 2006 preliminary study, orphaned Rwandan adolescents, who reported ongoing trauma symptoms since the 1994 genocide, were treated with TFT. A 2008 Randomized Controlled Trial (RCT) examined the efficacy of TFT treatments facilitated by Rwandan Community leaders in reducing PTS symptoms in adult survivors of the 1994 genocide.

Results of the 2008 study were replicated in a second RCT in Rwanda in 2009. A fourth RCT in Uganda (in preparation for submission) demonstrated significant differences in a third community leader-administered TFT treatment. The studies described here suggest that one-time, community leader-facilitated TFT interventions may be beneficial with protracted PTS in genocide survivors.

To view the full article from Science Publications, click here

Cite this Article: Dunnewold, A.L., 2014. Thought field therapy efficacy following large scale traumatic events. Curr. Res. Psychol., 5: 34-39.

excerpted from Science Publications, Current Research in Psychology. Volume 5, Issue 1

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Crying woman

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The following is a case study submitted to Joanne Callahan as part of TFT-Dx certification:

Case Study:

Female in her mid 30’s: lost her son at the age of 4 due to a rare genetic disorder less than a year ago. It is coming up on the first anniversary of his death. He was completely dependent on his mother and was not mobile at all. Fed by tube feeding, suction machines and continuous 24/7 care. Diagnosis was given with an undefined outcome of not knowing what each day would hold and the outcome being death.

So her life was a ticking time bomb for 4 years.

Current condition: She was feeling anxiety and fear of not knowing, not knowing how she will cope with the first anniversary. Anger for losing her son in the first place, why did this happen to her??

Algorithms used – Complex trauma with anger and guilt and she went from a 10 to 3.5.

I then corrected for level two reversal and repeated the algorithms. Ending SUD was a ZERO- there was no feeling of anxiety when thinking of the first anniversary or thinking of his death.

We finished off with ER- Floor to ceiling eye roll.

Comments: Client B was nervous and found it extremely difficult to hum the tune of Happy Birthday in the beginning. She fought back tears and somewhat choking in her throat. Her SUD dropped steadily and with a great response.

I found that she was humming without a prompt and more ease, without me having to remind her to hum the tune. No evidence of PR or Apex problems and she was extremely open to the treatment and findings.

During the treatment Client was swaying from side to side, she felt at peace, light and carefree.

Excerpted from “The Thought Field”, Volume 23, Issue 3

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Figure 1. A representation of the medical model conceptualisation of the relationship between “symptoms” and “treatment.”

Figure 1. A representation of the medical model conceptualisation of the relationship between “symptoms” and “treatment.”

Thought Field Therapy – The missing link to effective trauma-informed care and practice

By Christopher Semmens Clinical Psychologist Perth, Western Australia

All truth passes through three stages. First, it is ridiculed. Second, it is violently opposed. Third, it is accepted as being self-evident. Arthur Schopenhauer

There is nothing more difficult to take in hand, more perilous to conduct, or more uncertain in its success, than to take the lead in the introduction of a new order of things. Niccolo Machiavlli

Trauma- informed care and practice is a framework for the provision of services for mental health clients that originated in the early 1990s and has especially been put forth as a sensible service model since Harris and Fallot’s 2001 publication Using trauma theory to design service systems. Trauma-informed care can be seen to be characterised by three main considerations in regard to the provision of treatment services:

  1. That they incorporate a recognition of the reality that there is a high incidence of traumatic stress in those presenting for mental health care services.
  2. That a comprehensive understanding of the significant psychological, neurological, biological and social manifestation of traumatic and violent experiences can have on a person.
  3. That the care provided to these clients in recognising these effects is collaborative, skill-based and supportive.

In Australia these ideas were the focus of a consciousness raising conference: Trauma-Informed Care and Practice: Meeting the Challenge conducted by the Mental Health Coordinating Council in Sydney in June 2011. The conference was part of an initiative towards a national agenda to promote the philosophy of trauma-informed care to be integrated into practice across service systems throughout Australia.

It has only really been since studies such as (more…)

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In April — July 1994, extremists from the ethnic majority murdered between 800,000 and 1,000,00 persons, mostly of the ethnic minority, and displaced two million more.

Children witnessed their families killed before their eyes, people left maimed and scarred. The trauma and terror of this time left the country without peace, without trust and without hope. TFT has played a large part in mending these wounds.

Every year in April, the Rwandan people have a Remembrance Day. A period of time to re-affirm a commitment to peace, understanding, hope and to never let this happen again.

The strength of TFT has become so well-known, practitioners were invited to several of the events to treat those overcome by grief, trauma and pain when remembering those days.

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Finding Traumatic Roots to Release Today’s Presenting Problems

by Stephen W. Carter, MA, TFT-Dx

As a Quantum-Touch® bioenergy healing instructor I often receive calls from training graduates asking how to handle difficult client situations.

A former student and client we’ll call Karen called asking how best to manage a distance healing request for a longtime friend with serious pancreatic cancer. The cancer had spread to her friend’s liver and other organs. The treating oncologist estimated her friend, we’ll call Jim, had about two months to live. Neither chemotherapy or radiation treatment offered any hope of recovery according to Jim’s doctor.

The protocol for distance healing is straightforward and well known to Karen. Her consultation request related to behavior by Jim’s wife and Karen’s own emotional reactions to Jim’s pending death.

We discussed specific strategies relating to Jim’s wife and then turned our attention to Karen’s emotional reactions. She felt a profound sense of sadness and worry compounded by fear she might be blamed for not doing enough to save Jim’s life. When I asked Karen (more…)

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Interview on KAOI talkradio in Hawaii with Bob Stone, co-producer of the TFT Foundation’s documentary “From Trauma to Peace” and Joanne Callahan, co-developer of Thought Field Therapy (TFT) and president of the TFT Foundation.

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TFT Allows Us the Feelings We Need

By Robert Bray, PhD, LCSW, CTS, TFT-Dx

TFT in the bereavement process

In my experience, the most common problem with grief is people not grieving. When a client comes in looking for help with grief, the first question I ask is, ‘What are you doing? How are you grieving?

The most common response is that it hurts too much and “I cry ever time I remember (he or she) is gone.”

Avoiding the memories, avoiding the parts of their current life that triggers the memories, or avoiding sharing memories with others is a common coping mechanism to manage the pain even for the toughest person. Taking the time to be with feelings of love for the one who has died and integrating the fact that person is no longer with him or her is a necessary component in reconstructing a life.

Grieving is an active process requiring our engagement. Time passively passed without our conscious awareness is of little help in this process. Time spent locked in overwhelming emotion that freezes our thinking and prevents us from taking action is of less help. Making the change in our being requires living with the reality of having been given the gifts of our loved one and now being without the physical presence of his or her. TFT provides a means to getting unstuck and using our feelings in this change process.

A woman in her late forties approached me after a presentation at a conference and asked for help dealing with the loss of her son three years earlier. In his early twenties he had been killed in (more…)

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