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Posts Tagged ‘death’

Crying woman

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The following is a case study submitted to Joanne Callahan as part of TFT-Dx certification:

Case Study:

Female in her mid 30’s: lost her son at the age of 4 due to a rare genetic disorder less than a year ago. It is coming up on the first anniversary of his death. He was completely dependent on his mother and was not mobile at all. Fed by tube feeding, suction machines and continuous 24/7 care. Diagnosis was given with an undefined outcome of not knowing what each day would hold and the outcome being death.

So her life was a ticking time bomb for 4 years.

Current condition: She was feeling anxiety and fear of not knowing, not knowing how she will cope with the first anniversary. Anger for losing her son in the first place, why did this happen to her??

Algorithms used – Complex trauma with anger and guilt and she went from a 10 to 3.5.

I then corrected for level two reversal and repeated the algorithms. Ending SUD was a ZERO- there was no feeling of anxiety when thinking of the first anniversary or thinking of his death.

We finished off with ER- Floor to ceiling eye roll.

Comments: Client B was nervous and found it extremely difficult to hum the tune of Happy Birthday in the beginning. She fought back tears and somewhat choking in her throat. Her SUD dropped steadily and with a great response.

I found that she was humming without a prompt and more ease, without me having to remind her to hum the tune. No evidence of PR or Apex problems and she was extremely open to the treatment and findings.

During the treatment Client was swaying from side to side, she felt at peace, light and carefree.

Excerpted from “The Thought Field”, Volume 23, Issue 3

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Relief Effort Continues In The Philippines After Typhoon Haiyan Devastation

On Nov. 8, the Philippines experienced a devastating typhoon that left over 5,700 dead and more than 1,700 missing, with about 4 million people displaced. The TFT Foundation is very pleased that the blog now has instructions for the TFT trauma relief technique translated into the Filipino language, Tagalog. You will find it on the right side of this page, under Pages–Technique Instructions–Filipino/Tagalog. Many thanks to Maribeth Cowley for this translation! Please share it with anyone you know in, or having access to, the Philippines. With your help we can do much to relieve the severe trauma experienced by thousands of Filipinos.

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ManAnxious

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By Monika D’Agate, London, UK, driving instructor and TFT therapist, shares how a student of hers used TFT to help a nephew reclaim his life.

This young man is a very kind and sensitive individual, high achiever with very good grades at school. He has a supportive and caring family.

He only had his driving license for one year when an accident happened. Driving his father’s car only on occasion had given him very little experience. Furthermore, the country he lived in has very poor standards of competence, allowing people to take their driving test only after 30h of practical driver education.

Where it could be enough for someone with existing skills, for most people starting from scratch, it’s half or even less of what is really necessary to be competent and safe on the road. Sometimes people think that they are born with driving skills and they acquire more common sense as they get older. It’s rarely the case for the former one and not always the case for the latter.

One late evening, this 19 year old was driving back home from his factory, where he had a part time job. His parents bought him a car the week before. He was approaching a bend, not going fast, but when a car came up from the opposite side, blinding him with its high beam lights, he hit something.

It was a man on a bicycle, wearing dark clothing, on a bike without any lights. (more…)

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Finding Traumatic Roots to Release Today’s Presenting Problems

by Stephen W. Carter, MA, TFT-Dx

As a Quantum-Touch® bioenergy healing instructor I often receive calls from training graduates asking how to handle difficult client situations.

A former student and client we’ll call Karen called asking how best to manage a distance healing request for a longtime friend with serious pancreatic cancer. The cancer had spread to her friend’s liver and other organs. The treating oncologist estimated her friend, we’ll call Jim, had about two months to live. Neither chemotherapy or radiation treatment offered any hope of recovery according to Jim’s doctor.

The protocol for distance healing is straightforward and well known to Karen. Her consultation request related to behavior by Jim’s wife and Karen’s own emotional reactions to Jim’s pending death.

We discussed specific strategies relating to Jim’s wife and then turned our attention to Karen’s emotional reactions. She felt a profound sense of sadness and worry compounded by fear she might be blamed for not doing enough to save Jim’s life. When I asked Karen (more…)

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TFT Allows Us the Feelings We Need

By Robert Bray, PhD, LCSW, CTS, TFT-Dx

TFT in the bereavement process

In my experience, the most common problem with grief is people not grieving. When a client comes in looking for help with grief, the first question I ask is, ‘What are you doing? How are you grieving?

The most common response is that it hurts too much and “I cry ever time I remember (he or she) is gone.”

Avoiding the memories, avoiding the parts of their current life that triggers the memories, or avoiding sharing memories with others is a common coping mechanism to manage the pain even for the toughest person. Taking the time to be with feelings of love for the one who has died and integrating the fact that person is no longer with him or her is a necessary component in reconstructing a life.

Grieving is an active process requiring our engagement. Time passively passed without our conscious awareness is of little help in this process. Time spent locked in overwhelming emotion that freezes our thinking and prevents us from taking action is of less help. Making the change in our being requires living with the reality of having been given the gifts of our loved one and now being without the physical presence of his or her. TFT provides a means to getting unstuck and using our feelings in this change process.

A woman in her late forties approached me after a presentation at a conference and asked for help dealing with the loss of her son three years earlier. In his early twenties he had been killed in (more…)

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“Thank you for providing me the TFT tools & protocols to overcome the trauma I recently experienced regarding my Moms sudden death and for preparing me for my Fathers heart surgery this coming Monday. TFT has made the fear, rage, guilt, & deep sense of loss I felt prior to using the TFT tools easier for be able to process and reach a feeling of total acceptance & healing.”

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sad woman

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From “The Thought Field”, Vol 2, Issue 3

by Fred Gallo

A young mother, 23, saw me about the trauma when her first child was born and died in the hospital a couple days later. This placed a strain of her relationship with her husband since he did not appear to be caring or understanding about this. She was depressed and had lost the love she previously had for her husband.

Although I couldn’t do much for her marriage, we successfully treated the trauma of the death of her baby with a few minutes as well as the trauma of a cousin’s suicide. I saw her for a time and helped her resolve the depression, also with TFT. The traumas never came back to haunt or bother her.

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By Jim Mc Aninch, CTR, CEAP, TFT-Dx, from the “ATFT Update”, Issue 3, Summer 2005:

A Great Crisis Intervention Tool

I am the Industrial Coordinator for Pittsburgh’s Critical Incident Stress Management (CISM) team and I have found TFT to be a very powerful tool in working with the individuals in these situations.

The principal goals of a CISM team are: (1) To reduce emotional tension. (2) To facilitate normal recovery process of normal people having normal, healthy reactions to abnormal events. (3) To identify individuals who might need additional support or referral to professionals for specific care. A CISM program is neither psychotherapy nor a substitute for psychotherapy. When I receive a call it is generally associated with a fatality at the workplace.

I first used TFT at a construction site where an individual witnessed an individual fall to his death. What created a problem for him was that he had a very similar near fatality for himself a numbers of years ago which ended up resurfacing for him creating visible anxiety for him.

I was able to have him follow me with the trauma algorithm and you were able to see the change and he was no longer feeling the anxiety from his previous fall.

The next time I had an opportunity to use TFT at an electrocution of an employee at a small company with a family type environment. I first treated them as a group using the complex trauma with anger and guilt. I also included hopelessness.

I then found that some people we’re having problems with other traumas in their past so I treated them separately.

I was able to use this procedure at a number of fatalities at a number of large industrial settings with ease and great success. My team coordinator was very skeptical at first on my using this until he was able to see the success and rapid results. The coordinator was quick to see the value in TFT and we are now planning a training for the team.

Recently, I was able to take HRV readings in addition to using the TFT protocol with very interesting results.

I was called to the fatality and I was there a couple of hours after a conductor on the plant railroad was crushed between two cars. (more…)

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The following article is from “David Baldwin’s Trauma Information Pages”  and was written by Charles R. Figley, PhD,  Director of the Tulane University (formerly of Florida State University) Traumatology Institute. On behalf of the institution, he is editor in chief for Traumatology, the field’s independent, peer-reviewed, scientific/medical journal.

Charles R. Figley, PhD

Psychosocial Stress Research Program & Clinical Laboratory
Florida State University
Tallahassee, FL 32306-4097
June 27, 1995

Dear Colleagues,
As some of you may recall, I sent out early last year, via Internet and other media, nominations from clinicians about approaches that appeared to offer a “cure” for PTSD. I had become frustrated that, although we knew a great deal about the etiology, incidence and prevalence of PTSD, there was no known cure. My intention was to find a cure. and if one could not be found, build upon those offering the best hope for providing one.

Thanks to the help of colleagues all over the world, we were able to find four approaches that appeared to hold great promise for reaching our goal. We were so impressed with them that we invited the innovators of these approaches to our clinical laboratory for a week to participate in our systematic clinical demonstration study. The primary purpose of their visit was to treat our clients, while meeting with our Tallahassee clinical practitioner colleagues prior to and following their work here. The Four approaches we studied were: Traumatic Incident Reduction, Visual Kinesthetic Dissociation, Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing, and Thought Field Therapy (TFT).

Here I would like to tell you about one of the four approaches. I do this not because we are suggesting that it is better than any other approach. All four of the approaches we investigated generated impressive results. But TFT stood out from all other approaches of which I am aware because of five reasons:

  1. It is extraordinarily powerful, in that clients receive nearly immediate relief from their suffering and the treatment appears to be permanent.
  2. It can be taught to nearly anyone so that clients can not only treat themselves, but treat others affected.
  3. It appears to do no harm.
  4. It does not require the client to talk about their troubles, something that often causes more emotional pain and discourages many for seeking treatment.
  5. It is extremely efficient (fast and long-lasting).

In this brief space I would like to describe how it works in sufficient detail to permit you to try it yourself. By doing so, my hope is that the necessary work of clinical research will begin in as many laboratories as possible. It is only after the difficult work of science in testing the utility of the approach and an explanation for its effectiveness will it be sanctioned by our fields and utilized extensively. And, then, will we have a chance of realizing the full potential of this important discovery.

Dr. Figley then describes how to use the basic TFT trauma algorithm and invites colleagues to join him as “collaborative investigators” into the effects of TFT.

 

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Published in “The Thought Field”, Volume 7, Issue 3:

Trauma and Grief Across the Border

by Oneyda Maestas

My name is Oneyda Maestas. I live in a very small town called Kim, CO. I have been in the education profession for 9 years. I currently am a Kindergarten/First Grade teacher at Kim Elementary School.

My background and experience with TFT. I met Dr. Jenny Edwards during a Fielding Institute Training. She cured my “head-splitting” migraine with TFT. I was amazed as it usually takes a prescription drug to rid me of one of these headaches. I inquired more about what she had done to me and soon thereafter registered for her Level I and II TFT workshop. It was absolutely fantastic!

I began practicing TFT by tapping with my parents, co-workers, friends, and students at school (it worked well for discipline issues, anger/aggression on the playground, minor accidents). The results were phenomenal. It was amazing.

Then, Dr. Edwards informed me about a TFT workshop in Mexico City to be offered in Spanish. I was so excited, as I am a fluent Spanish speaker. In Jan./Feb. of 2001, I trained in Mexico City, TFT (TCM in Spanish). I met many people and assisted Father Luis and Dr. Edwards in administering TFT to others in the workshop.

I worked with a lady named Connie Bravo, who was also attending the conference. She is the leader of a parent therapy group, whose children have died. She found out that I was staying a few extra days after the conference and offered me room and board, if I would provide TFT to her parent group. (more…)

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